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DIY Pumpkin Spice Body Butter

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This decadent DIY pumpkin spice body butter is whipped to fluffy perfection. It contains a luxurious combination of soft nilotica shea butter, rich bacuri butter, fractionated coconut oil, and beeswax. Red and yellow clay provide a silky skin feel and a natural pop of colour, while natural essential oils create a non-toxic fragrance.

This homemade body butter’s creamy texture easily melts into skin, and its aromatic pumpkin spice scent is a treat for your senses. Read on to learn how to make a natural pumpkin spice body butter for fall.

DIY pumpkin spice body butter

Does anything say “fall” more than pumpkin spice? The second September rolls around, everything from lip gloss to body lotion is given the pumpkin treatment. And while we love everything pumpkin spice, we don’t love the toxic, low-quality fragrances frequently used to evoke this popular autumn scent.

Unfortunately, scented products are not harmless. It may be fun to adorn your home and your body with the aromas of fall, but synthetic fragrances are linked to a number of health issues.

“Fragrance” is a catch-all term for thousands of possibly harmful ingredients, none of which are required to be disclosed on the product’s label.

You’re much better off choosing products scented with natural essential oils. While they might not be as potent, most of the time natural products smell just as good as their synthetic counterparts. Plus, you’ll save yourself the headaches and respiratory issues that exposure to synthetic fragrances can cause.

Homemade pumpkin spice body butter

So, skip the bath and body store in the mall and make this non-toxic homemade pumpkin spice body butter instead. This silky body butter recipe is extremely nourishing to dry skin. It has a light and airy consistency thanks to a special combination of plant butters.

This homemade body butter is also extremely easy to make. All you’ll need is a handheld mixer and a small selection of natural ingredients. No fancy equipment is required, and since this formula is free of water, it doesn’t require a preservative.

Despite this recipe’s simplicity, we know some prefer the convenience of a store bought product. If you’d rather buy than DIY, we recommend this natural pumpkin spice body butter.

Ingredients for DIY pumpkin spice body butter

Nilotica shea butter

This pumpkin spice body butter’s secret ingredient is nilotica shea butter. Unlike Western shea butter, which tends to be quite firm, nilotica shea butter is very soft.

This is because nilotica contains a higher percentage of oleic acid than Western shea butter. Oleic acid is liquid at room temperature, which makes for a thinner consistency.

Nitolica shea butter is what gives this body butter recipe its silky, lotion-like texture. It doesn’t feel heavy and melts on contact with body heat. Once whipped, it becomes so light that it seems to almost disappear into skin.

Another added benefit of nilotica shea butter it that it won’t turn grainy like Western shea butter can. Often when shea butter is melted and re-solidified, the fatty acids cool at different rates, leading to granules in the final product. This won’t happen with nilotica – when melted down, it will be just as smooth and uniform as before.

Bacuri butter

Bacuri butter is a rich, deeply coloured butter that hails from the Brazilian rainforest. It’s incredibly emollient which makes it ideal for dry or mature skin types. However, despite its rich, fudge-like texture, it absorbs readily into skin.

The addition of bacuri butter to this recipe is not only for its moisturizing properties. It also helps give this nourishing body butter a lovely warm tone that complements its pumpkin spice scent.

Due to its deep, dark brown tone, bacuri butter can also lend a lovely glow to the skin. Our blogging friend Rebecca of Soap Deli News has a lovely recipe for a DIY mineral bronzing butter with bacuri butter.

Bacuri butter is also a key ingredient in our peppermint hot cocoa body butter and our chocolate cleansing balm.

Homemade pumpkin spice body butter with essential oils

Fractionated coconut oil or MCT oil

Fractionated coconut oil and MCT oil are interchangeable in this recipe. Both oils have undergone the process of fractionation, which removes most of the long chain fatty acids. This results in oils that are liquid at room temperature.

One of the main benefits of these oils is that they’re made of mostly saturated fatty acids, which are very resistant to oxidation. They’re also much more shelf stable than other liquid carrier oils like sweet almond oil. This will help your pumpkin spice body butter last longer.

Fractionated coconut oil and MCT oil possess many of the same benefits as regular coconut oil, including antibacterial and anti-fungal benefits. They’re also less comedogenic. Many people, especially those with acne-prone skin, may find that regular coconut oil can clog their pores and cause breakouts.

Beeswax

A small amount of natural beeswax adds some structure to this homemade body butter. This allows it to retain its fluffy, airy texture during storage. If kept in a cool place, this recipe will not need to be re-whipped.

Beeswax also has soothing, humectant, and moisturizing properties, making it a great addition to this skin-nourishing recipe.

However, if you’re allergic to bee products or would prefer a homemade body butter without beeswax, then you can use plant-based candelilla wax as a substitute.

Red and yellow clay

Artificial colours and dyes are frequently used in low-quality store bought body butters. Instead, we used natural french red clay and french yellow clay powders to give this pumpkin spice body butter its characteristic pumpkin colour.

Combined with bacuri butter, these clay powders also provide a subtle bronzing effect. They also help tone down the richness of the oils and butters for a non-greasy texture.

Vitamin E oil

If you’ve ever smelled stale or rancid oil, you know it’s not pleasant, and it’s not good for your skin, either. We added a small amount of vitamin E oil to this DIY pumpkin spice body butter for its potent antioxidant activity.

This recipe is comprised of mostly saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. SFAs are very resistant to oxidation, but the MUFAs in shea and bacuri butters will oxidize faster. Vitamin E helps lengthen this product’s shelf life by slowing down this process.

How to make this body butter smell like pumpkin spice

We used Plant Therapy’s Pumpkin Pie essential oil blend to give this DIY body butter its sweet and aromatic pumpkin spice scent, but that particular product is not always available. However, you can also use a specific combination of essential oils for a similar aroma.

Our pumpkin spice fragrance requires seven different essential oils. We know that may be too much to purchase for some, so for a simpler and easier fragrance, we suggest using a pre-made pumpkin pie essential oil blend.

You can use it alone, or mix it with copaiba oleoresin and vanilla absolute for a sweeter, more decadent pumpkin spice scent.

DIY pumpkin spice body butter with spoon

Pumpkin spice essential oil blend

Copaiba oleoresin

Sweet, rich, and subtly spicy, copaiba oleoresin provides the base for this body butter’s pumpkin spice fragrance. It adds a woodsy sweetness that can’t be replaced by any other oil.

Copaiba is potently anti-inflammatory and one of the safest essential oils for use on the skin. It can be used at high percentages without irritation. Additionally, it’s known for its analgesic effects, which is why it’s frequently used in topical pain relief balms.

Because this recipe’s percentage of copaiba oil is so high, this body butter can even be helpful in soothing minor muscle and joint paint.

Vanilla oleoresin

Vanilla oleoresin has a sweet, delicious aroma that is both calming and uplifting. It posseses anti-inflammatory properties which can aid in soothing dry or irritated skin.

Additionally, vanilla contains B vitamins, including niacin and B6, which are vital in maintaining healthy skin.

Vanilla is imperative for this pumpkin spice body butter’s fragrance. It helps balance and sweeten the spicy notes of the other oils, giving the scent a more dessert-like quality. Since it’s so mild, vanilla can be used at high concentrations with minimal risk of irritation.

Cardamom essential oil

Cardamom, a key ingredient in chai tea, lends a spicy and warming quality to this body butter. Its stimulating, unique aroma is impossible to replicate with any other spice.

Not only does cardamom essential oil smell lovely, but it also possesses powerful aromatherapeutic benefits. Its fragrance can help soothe nausea and upset stomachs.

Cardamom may be potent, but it’s actually one of the safer spice oils. It can be used at much higher skin concentrations than oils like cinnamon and nutmeg, which is why it makes up a larger percentage of this pumpkin spice blend.

Cinnamon essential oil

Is there any scent more synonymous with fall than cinnamon? Cinnamon is an extremely spicy and potent essential oil, and there’s no question that it’s vital for the “spice” in pumpkin spice.

Cinnamon oil is a common ingredient in massage oils due to its ability to boost circulation. It contains the antimicrobial compound cinnamaldehyde, which is why it’s also often used in DIY cleaning products.

Since cinnamon is so potent, it’s important to exercise extreme caution when using any kind of cinnamon essential oil topically. All cinnamon varieties can cause skin sensitization if used without proper dilution, which is why we’ve kept the concentration in this recipe very low.

For safety, we recommend using the lighter, less potent cinnamon leaf essential oil rather than cinnamon bark essential oil.

It’s important to note than when using any spice oils, you should not exceed the recommended quantities. Alternatively, you can choose to skip the cinnamon essential oil in this recipe altogether.

Cinnamon essential oil is contraindicated for use in pregnancy or when breastfeeding.

Whipped pumpkin spice body butter in jar

Clove bud essential oil

Clove is also touted for its antimicrobial properties. Like cinnamon, clove boasts a warm, spicy scent that makes it lovely for adding to your diffuser during the fall and winter seasons.

The clove essential oil in this recipe blends perfectly with the other essential oils to help create the spicy notes in this pumpkin spice fragrance.

However, much like cinnamon, clove’s spiciness can contribute to dermal irritation. For this reason, we’ve limited the clove oil in this recipe to a few drops.

Nutmeg essential oil

Nutmeg pairs well with other warming essential oils such as clove, cardamon and cinnamon. Its unique aroma is an important component of pumpkin spice’s warmth. Like clove, nutmeg also boasts antimicrobial properties.

As with all spicy essential oils, caution should be exercised with nutmeg essential oil. In high doses, whole nutmeg has psychotropic and anti-cholinergic effects.

Ginger essential oil

You can’t make a pumpkin spice blend without ginger essential oil. Its sharp and sweet aroma is the final note in this pumpkin spice essential oil blend.

Ginger essential oil is spicy, warm and stimulating. For aromatherapy purposes, it is known to help reduce feelings of stress and anxiety. It can also help with nausea and digestive discomfort.

As well, ginger has been shown to posses anti-inflammatory properties. It stimulates circulation and can help relieve minor aches and pains when used in massage lotions and oils.

DIY Pumpkin Spice Body Butter Recipe

Ingredients

3/4 cup nilotica shea butter
1/4 cup liquid coconut oil or MCT oil
1 tbsp bacuri butter
1.5 tbsp beeswax pellets or 3/4 tbsp candelilla wax
1/2 tbsp red clay
1/2 tbsp yellow clay
1 tsp vitamin E oil

Pumpkin Spice Essential Oil Blend

70 drops pumpkin pie essential oil blend, or:

30 drops copaiba oleoresin
30 drops vanilla oleoresin
10 drops cardamom essential oil
3 drops ginger essential oil
3 drops clove bud essential oil
3 drops cinnamon leaf essential oil
3 drops nutmeg essential oil

Supplies

Stainless steel mixing bowl (or double boiler)
Handheld mixer
Silicone spatula
Glass jar with lid

Instructions

  1. To begin, combine the beeswax (or candelilla wax) with the fractionated coconut oil (or MCT oil) in a stainless steel mixing bowl. Place the mixing bowl over a pot of water on medium heat. If you wish, you can also use a real double boiler for this step.
  2. Maintain medium heat while stirring frequently. (Since fractionated coconut oil and MCT oil are mostly saturated, they won’t be damaged by high heat.) Once the oil is hot and the wax has liquified, reduce the heat to low and proceed to the next step.
  3. Add the bacuri butter and stir until completely liquified. You may need to increase the heat slightly to get it to incorporate.
  4. Reduce the heat to low before adding the nilotica shea butter, red and yellow clay powders, and vitamin E oil. The nilotica will melt easily, but stir to make sure everything is thoroughly combined. If any lumps begin to form, you can turn up the heat slightly once more to get rid of them.
  5. Once the mixture is completely uniform and liquified, turn off the stove and remove the bowl from the heat. (Take caution and use oven mitts.)
  6. Place the bowl into the fridge for at least an hour until cold and firm. Then, take it out of the fridge and allow the body butter to come to room temperature before whipping. (This is important, otherwise your body butter could turn grainy.) Don’t be alarmed if it’s a very deep colour, as it will lighten significantly once whipped.
  7. Right before whipping, add the pumpkin spice essential oil blend.
  8. Whip the body butter with a handheld mixer for 3-5 minutes. You want to use the highest setting to ensure maximum fluffiness. Once sufficiently whipped, the body butter will turn light orange and should have the texture of whipped cream or mousse.
  9. Transfer your whipped pumpkin spice body butter to a glass or stainless steel container for storage.

Recipe notes

Please don’t use this body butter on your face. Check with your doctor about using essential oils if you are pregnant, nursing, have any health conditions, or are taking prescription medication. Discontinue use if skin irritation occurs.

Pumpkin spice whipped body butter

Pumpkin spice essential oil safety

When using warm spice oils such as the ones in this pumpkin spice body butter recipe, it’s important to proceed with caution.

Please remember not to take essential oils internally without the guidance of a healthcare professional. As well, do not apply essential oils directly to the skin without diluting them in a carrier oil first.

For further information on essential oil use and safety, the books below are an important resource:

The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The Complete Guide to the use of Aromatic Oils in Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health and Well-Being by Julia Lawless

This bestselling aromatherapy book contains important information on the properties and actions of herbs and essential oils. It includes information on 165 oils, and is suitable for both beginners and experienced aromatherapists alike.

Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

This book is a comprehensive text on 400 essential oils and provides essential oil safety guidelines, essential oil/drug interactions, and detailed essential oil constituent data.

Whipped homemade pumpkin spice body butter

How to use your pumpkin spice body butter

Apply this nourishing body butter to slightly damp skin to lock in moisture. Massage in a circular motion to encourage circulation and thorough absorption. Use after exfoliating for especially soft, smooth, pumpkin spice-scented skin.

Store your product in a jar with an airtight lid and keep it in a cool, dark cupboard. Please choose a container made of stainless steel or glass, not plastic. Essential oils are potent and can erode plastic containers, releasing toxic compounds.

This pumpkin spice body butter should last up to two years, but you’ll most likely have used it up before the season is over!

Yield: 1 body butter

DIY Pumpkin Spice Body Butter

Pumpkin spice body butter recipe

Learn to make a decadent DIY pumpkin spice body butter that's whipped to fluffy perfection. Its creamy texture easily melts into skin, and its aromatic pumpkin spice scent is a treat for your senses. Made with natural essential oils

Active Time 2 minutes
Additional Time 30 minutes
Total Time 32 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $5

Materials

Pumpkin Spice Body Butter

Pumpkin Spice Essential Oil Blend

Tools

  • Stainless steel mixing bowl (or double boiler)
  • Handheld mixer
  • Silicone spatula
  • Glass jar with lid

Instructions

    1. To begin, combine the beeswax (or candelilla wax) with the fractionated coconut oil (or MCT oil) in a stainless steel mixing bowl. Place the mixing bowl over a pot of water on medium heat. (If you wish, you can also use a real double boiler for this step.)
    2. Maintain medium heat while stirring frequently. (Since fractionated coconut oil and MCT oil are mostly saturated, they won't be damaged by high heat.) Once the oil is hot and the wax has liquified, reduce the heat to low and proceed to the next step.
    3. Add the bacuri butter and stir until completely liquified. You may need to increase the heat slightly to get it to incorporate.
    4. Reduce the heat to low before adding the nilotica shea butter, red and yellow clay powders, and vitamin E oil. The nilotica will melt easily, but stir to make sure everything is thoroughly combined. If any lumps begin to form, you can turn up the heat slightly once more to get rid of them.
    5. Once the mixture is completely uniform and liquified, turn off the stove and remove the bowl from heat. (Take caution and use oven mitts.)
    6. Place the bowl into the fridge for at least an hour until cold and firm. Then, take it out of the fridge and allow the body butter to come to room temperature before whipping. (This is important, otherwise your body butter could turn grainy.) Don't be alarmed if it's a very deep colour, as it will lighten significantly once whipped.
    7. Right before whipping, add the pumpkin spice essential oil blend.
    8. Whip the body butter with a handheld mixer for 3-5 minutes. You want to use the highest setting to ensure maximum fluffiness. Once sufficiently whipped, the body butter will turn light orange and should have the texture of whipped cream or mousse.
    9. Transfer your whipped pumpkin spice body butter to a glass or stainless steel container for storage.

Notes

Never use this body butter on your face. Check with your doctor about using essential oils if you are pregnant, nursing, have any health conditions, or are taking prescription medication. Discontinue use if skin irritation occurs.

Recommended Products

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Did you make this DIY?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Pinterest

More DIY beauty recipes for fall

If you simply can’t get enough pumpkin spice products in your fall beauty routine, then check out this roundup of pumpkin spice beauty recipes from Cari of Everything Pretty.

We hope you enjoyed our fall body butter recipe. If you did, you may like some of our other bath and body recipes:

For even more natural DIY bath and body ideas, follow us on Pinterest! You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

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Homemade pumpkin spice body butter

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Karen Cotron

Friday 4th of September 2020

Can you explain what is a western shea butter? Never heard of it. Where is the origin of this WSB, or did you make it up?

Kyla

Friday 4th of September 2020

Hi Karen. Western shea butter is native to the West African savanna region, which is why it’s sometimes called Western shea butter. A quick Google search of “Western shea butter” will provide further information. Thanks for reading and commenting!

Michelle

Saturday 28th of September 2019

I bet this smells amazing! I love the look of it, too. You can tell by the picture how light and airy it is. It would make a great gift idea, too!

Kim

Saturday 28th of September 2019

Thanks, Michelle! It really does have a nice light texture and we have enjoyed using it!

Irena

Saturday 28th of September 2019

Beautiful recipe and photos, ladies! It was very interesting to learn about nilotica shea butter and the essential oil blend must smell wonderful.

Kim

Saturday 28th of September 2019

Thanks so much, Irena! Nilotica shea butter really does have a lovely texture and we tried our best to recreate the Plant Therapy pumpkin pie blend that we love!