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DIY Honey Almond Soap with Wheatgerm

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This easy-to-make honey almond soap with wheatgerm both cleanses and gently exfoliates dry skin. Crafted with honey melt and pour soap base, wheatgerm, and bitter almond essential oil, this soap recipe is intentionally simple. Read on to learn how to make this moisturizing honey almond scented soap recipe which also makes for an affordable handmade gift.

DIY honey almond soap

If the thought of soapmaking seems overwhelming, especially with all the safety equipment you need to buy, not to mention the handling of lye, this is your recipe.

And, since this recipe was crafted with the beginner soapmaker in mind, you won’t have to spend a lot of money on supplies. However, your initial investment for inexpensive items such silicone soap molds will allow you to keep making lovely handmade soaps for years to come.

Another benefit of this recipe is that the standard 4-6 weeks curing time for your soap won’t be necessary. In fact, your honey almond soap will be ready to enjoy after a few short days.

The main ingredient in this soap is honey melt and pour soap base. I’m not a soapmaker. In fact, I doubt I will ever tackle from-scratch soapmaking, so melt and pour is the my go-to when I want to make soap. But not actually make soap. If that makes sense.

What is melt and pour soap?

Melt and pour soap base comes in a variety of bases which allow you to customize your soap by adding different scents and colours.

Since the melt and pour soap base has already gone through the process of saponification, you won’t have to handle lye.

Saponification is the process during which soap is created by combining fatty acids (fats and oils) and lye. The resulting chemical reaction is what creates the soap.

With melt and pour base, as the name suggests, you melt the base, add your customized ingredients and pour it into soap molds.

Melt and pour soap base cut into cubes

Benefits of using melt and pour soap

Melt and pour is ideal for those of us who are hesitant to tackle traditional soapmaking due to the handling of lye.

I suffer from severe migraines, so I strive to avoid anything that could trigger an attack. And lye and migraines don’t seem like a good combination.

Even with the safety equipment, which obviously you should use, I can see the fumes lingering and trigging an migraine. So for me, handling lye isn’t an option.

However, if you’re a seasoned soapmaker or if you want to learn, we have a fantastic cold process soap recipe and detailed, easy to follow tutorial from Rebecca of Soap Deli News. As her blog name would suggest, she knows what she’s doing. This is definitely a case of me wanting to leave it (soapmaking) to the experts.

Homemade honey almond soaps with wheatgerm

Ingredients for honey almond soap

Honey melt and pour soap base

Honey is wonderful for skin due to its high antioxidant activity. Antioxidants help keep free radicals at bay, and since free radicals contribute to skin aging, they’re ideal for use in beauty and skincare.

Also, because honey is a natural humectant, it can attract and bind moisture to your skin. Additionally, it has antimicrobial properties and a low ph which makes it more inhospitable to bacteria.

Bitter almond essential oil

Bitter almond essential oil, not to be confused with sweet almond oil, is a fragrant oil that boasts an incredible scent. It’s not technically an essential oil but an aromatic compound called benzaldehyde. 

The intoxicating sweet, yet nutty aroma it of bitter almond is why we have used it in a variety of recipes, including our sugar cookie body butter and our holiday room sprays. It smells amazing! 

While bitter almonds are notoriously toxic, the bitter almond essential oil sold in stores for soapmaking purposes is safe for use in soap, but should not be ingested.

But always check the label. You don’t want it to confuse it with the bitter almond that requires special licensing to purchase. The only bitter almond essential oil that is safe for use in skincare products and soaps is rectified, which means the toxic prussic acid has been removed.

DIY honey almond soap on wood plate

We bought bitter almond oil from a beauty and soapmaking supply store near us. But you can also purchase bitter almond essential oil from Eden Botanicals. Their bitter almond essential oil is steam distilled from the crushed and pressed kernels of the apricot fruit and has been rectified to remove the prussic acid.

You should still keep bitter almond essential oil out of reach of children and pets. Its smell is very tempting so you want to be sure to store it in a safe place. 

Also, remember that essential oils should be diluted before application. They should not be applied directly to the skin since this can cause irritation.

If you have any health concerns, it’s important to be aware of any contraindications of the essential oils that you are using or if in doubt, consult with your healthcare provider or a certified aromatherapist.

Wheatgerm

I added wheatgerm in this recipe for its exfoliating properties. I’m technically gluten-free and have been for 3 years, but since I’m not ingesting it, I made an exception for use in this soap!

You can also substitute the wheatgerm for oatmeal, if you prefer, to make a honey almond oatmeal soap.

Honey almond scented soap with wheatgerm

Tools for making honey almond soap

  • Cutting board – to chop your melt and pour soap base
  • Sharp knife or grater – you can choose to cut or grate your melt and pour soap
  • Measuring spoons – to measure the honey
  • Spray bottle with small amount of vodka – this helps remove any bubbles that form on the surface of your soap
  • Heat-safe bowl and pot or pan (or double boiler) – to melt down your soap base
  • Heat-safe spatula or wooden spoon
  • Soap mold – choose a soap mold made of silicone so it can withstand higher temperatures

How to make honey almond soap

Prepare your equipment by washing it in hot soapy water.

Chop or grate your melt and pour base so that it melts more easily.

Cutting melt and pour soap base

Place your soap base pieces in a double boiler or in a heat safe glass bowl used over a saucepan of water. This is to ensure that your soap will melt easily but you won’t have to worry about it burning. Stir often and watch it closely, as it won’t take long to melt.

You can also use your microwave for this step. We tend to avoid using our microwave, but if you use this method, carefully melt the soap in 15-20 second increments and stir in between.

Once the soap has completely melted, remove it from the heat.

Next, stir in the honey and bitter almond oil and mix to combine. Then, add the wheatgerm and stir again.

Your soap is now ready to be poured into your molds. I used a standard bar shaped soap mold but you can chose from a variety of sizes and shapes.

Spritz any bubbles that appear on the top of your soap with the vodka and set aside. Many people use rubbing alcohol for this step. However, since the smell of rubbing alcohol gives me a migraine, I never use it and opt to use vodka instead.

Allow your soap to set and cool for at approximately 20 minutes. Don’t move it until it’s set. You can also place your molds on a baking tray so that they are easier to move once they’ve set. Next, move the tray with your soaps to an area where your soap can set for another 4-6 hours, or overnight.

The next day, remove your soap from the molds and allow them to dry out for a few days. 3 days is usually enough time.

Homemade honey almond soap on napkin

Recipe notes

I estimate that the cost to make each bar of soap is less than $2. Handmade soaps can range in price from $4-8, so this recipe is definitely economical.

Packaging your honey almond soap for gift giving

As mentioned, I think this fragrant soap would make for a lovely handmade gift. Perhaps as a hostess gift, or as a stocking stuffer for the homemade beauty lover in your life.

Honey almond soap on wood plate

To prepare your soaps for gifting, simply wrap them individually in brown paper and then tie your package with natural cotton string. Or place the soaps in a pretty air-tight jar or decorative tin.

Also, melt and pour soap can be prone to glycerin dew so it’s often recommended that you wrap your handmade soap in plastic wrap before wrapping it in the paper, or before putting it in tins or jars.

Yield: 3 bars

DIY Honey Almond Soap with Wheatgerm

DIY honey almond soap

Learn how to make an easy DIY honey almond soap recipe using melt and pour soap. Crafted with honey melt and pour soap base, wheatgerm, and bitter almond essential oil, this almond scented soap recipe is intentionally simple. Also makes for an affordable handmade gift.

Active Time 30 minutes
Additional Time 3 days
Total Time 3 days 30 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $6

Materials

Tools

  • Cutting board
  • Sharp knife or box grater
  • Measuring spoons
  • Spray bottle with vodka
  • Heat-safe bowl and pot (or double boiler)
  • Heat-safe spatula or wooden spoon
  • Silicone soap mold

Instructions

    1. Prepare your equipment by washing it in hot soapy water.
    2. Chop or grate your melt and pour base so that it melts more easily.
    3. Place your soap base pieces in a double boiler or in a heat safe glass bowl used over a saucepan of water. This is to ensure that your soap will melt easily but you won't have to worry about it burning. Stir often and watch it closely, as it won't take long to melt.

      You can also use your microwave for this step. We tend to avoid using our microwave, but if you use this method, carefully melt the soap in 15-20 second increments and stir in between.
    4. Once the soap has completely melted, remove it from the heat.
    5. Next, stir in the honey and bitter almond oil and mix to combine. Then, add the wheatgerm and stir again.
    6. Your soap is now ready to be poured into your molds. I used a standard bar shaped soap mold but you can chose from a variety of sizes and shapes.
    7. Spritz any bubbles that appear on the top of your soap with the vodka and set aside. Many people use rubbing alcohol for this step. However, since the smell of rubbing alchohol gives me a migraine, I never use it and opt to use vodka instead.
    8. Allow your soap to set and cool for at approximately 20 minutes. Don't move it until it's set. You can also place your molds on a baking tray so that they are easier to move once they've set. Next, move the tray with your soaps to an area where your soap can set for another 4-6 hours, or overnight.
    9. The next day, remove your soap from the molds and allow them to dry out for a few days. 3 days is usually enough time.

Notes

I estimate that the cost to make each bar of soap is less than $2. Handmade soaps can range in price from $4-8, so this recipe is definitely economical.

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Michelle

Sunday 15th of December 2019

I'm going to have to try this after the holidays when I have more time. I never knew about spritzing away the bubbles with alcohol. Great tip!!

Kim

Monday 16th of December 2019

Thanks, Michelle! We definitely didn't come up with the alcohol tip but replaced the standard rubbing alcohol with vodka due to our sensitivities and it worked!

Cari

Thursday 12th of December 2019

This soap looks so pretty! Great recipe and great photos.

Kim

Thursday 12th of December 2019

Thanks, Cari! We love the easy customization of melt and pour bases.

Rebecca Dillon

Saturday 7th of December 2019

This soap is so pretty. I can't wait to try out this recipe.

Kim

Saturday 7th of December 2019

Thanks, Rebecca!

Cyna

Friday 6th of December 2019

This soap sounds so soothing! I love the addition of wheat germ and your photography is truly stunning! I love how cosy and warm vibes! xo

Kim

Friday 6th of December 2019

Thanks so much, Cyna! xo